‘You’re joking’: Maryborough Qld mechanic wins $30k jackpot

WHEN Jonathon Selby got the call from the Channel 7 team, he thought it was a prank from his mate.

But the Maryborough mechanic was in disbelief when he was told he won $30,000 in Sunrise’s Cash Cow on Monday morning.

“You’re joking, right? You’re serious?” He asked the presenters.

“I have a workshop I’m trying to get open… I bought the workshop and I’ve had nothing but problems trying to open it.

“I can’t believe this.”

Mr Selby told the Chronicle the win couldn’t have come at a better time after his partner lost her job last week.

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He said the money would help to pay off the credit card as well as getting concreting and a new hoist for his workshop.

“I’m lost for words,” Mr Selby said.

“I have a mate that pranks me all the time, so thought it was him doing a prank at first.

“But I was speechless when I found out it was true.”

Mr Selby was lucky to answer the phone after two quick rings.

www.fcci.com.au

www.money-au.com

www.youbeautute.com

www.minimokes.com

In May,2017 a Torquay resident missed out on a $10,000 Cash Cow prize when she did not answer

Henry Sapiecha

Council to vote on Urangan Hervey Bay skyscraper complex in the Fraser Coast

SKYSCRAPER PLANS: Details of the proposed skyscraper development in Urangan.

SKYSCRAPERS in Urangan could soon become a reality.

A development application for two 20 storey buildings in Urangan will be voted on by councillors on Thursday.

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f successful, the green light will be given for Anscape Pty Ltd to start planning for the development of the skyscraper complex.

Council documents outline the construction of two 20 storey buildings, containing a total of 390 units, on the corner of Charlton Esplanade and Boat Harbour Dr.

Plans for about 775 car parks, a swimming pool and a restaurant are also revealed in the application.

SKYSCRAPER PLANS: Details of the proposed skyscraper development in Urangan.Contributed

Deputy mayor George Seymour, who has been vocal in his opposition of the proposed development, said he would be looking at the details “closely.”

“I’m still against it, but we have to vote on the basis whether it meets the requirements of the planning scheme,” Cr Seymour said.

“It has to be approved if it meets the requirements of the planning scheme.”

Cr Seymour said he was opposed to the idea of skyscrapers in a town like Hervey Bay.

“It changes the density and character of towns,” he said.

“You go to areas like the Gold Coast and the Sunshine Coast and see what happens to the community when you increase the density in terms of traffic.

Henry Sapiecha

DISCOVER ‘LITTLE NOOSA’ A LA MAAROOM SEASIDE VILLAGE FRASER COAST QLD-PIC GALLERY

I was priveleged enough to be introduced to a lifestyle that would satisfy a peace loving retiree needing a quiet fishing village atmosphere not too far removed from services. My newly found friends Lena & Paul had exposed this quiet paradise as a result of me selling to them a number of lucious exotic fruit trees that they will be planting at their newly acquired house & land property of 800m2 in their new paradise seaside home property. Paul is a musical mystro in the style of the ‘blues era’. Magnificent sound. I know because Lena had played for me sound tracks from Pauls music. PAUL CHEESEMAN MUSIC. His sample tracks will be posted into my site > www.mymusicfiles.net when available.

In the meantime enjoy the journey into ‘LITTLE NOOSA-MAAROOM QLD FRASER COAST’

Henry Sapiecha

Fraser Coast Icon Warren Persal, & his legacy of Achievements in his community

TRIBUTE: Fraser Coast icon Warren Persal, remembered

This story has been put together by our local news group below.

I & the Fraser Coast Community thank them for these great words

The Fraser Coast is mourning the loss of one of its greatest benefactors. Warren Persal was a legendary figure in the Queensland power line construction industry but will be remembered on the Fraser Coast for quietly helping thousands of individuals and generously supporting causes in the region. The man with the big heart died on September 23 aged 75 after battling ill health for several years.

HE WAS devastated and bewildered. His beautiful young wife had died from a blood clot a few days after giving birth to their first child. Rarely in his life would Warren Persal ever feel such a sense of helplessness.

He had lost his partner, had a new baby to care for and his job was way out west, building power lines in the dirt and the dust, the heat and the cold.

His mother Josephine stepped in, saying she would look after her new grandson Graham. Her son should go back out west and work through his grief.

Warren might have always been destined to become a legendary figure in building power lines on the coalfields and the Fraser Coast’s most generous benefactor but his family believe the experience had a powerful influence in shaping his extraordinary achievements.

“He and my mother had a plan to succeed,” said Graham. “When she died he felt he couldn’t stop – he had to honour that promise.”

Over the next 50 years Warren became synonymous with integrity, capability and reliability as he built thousands of kilometres of high transmission power lines in Queensland. His word was an iron-clad guarantee. His knowledge of the industry, equipment and logistics was startling: he knew what could be done and he delivered.

Said second son Brian: “The bottom line was ‘Get the job done’. Regardless.”

Brian’s sister Janet added: “And it always had to be good quality and on time.”

In a tough business working in remote and difficult conditions, Warren prospered on the back of an intensely loyal workforce. Back home quiet stories emerged in the community about surprising acts of generosity for staff, old friends and other individuals in need.

WARREN’S BEST FRIEND: Security dogs at Persal and Co industrial premises had a high turnover as Warren quickly grew fond of them and took several alsatians home, saying “He might get lonely at night.” His adored Kobi, a constant companion at work and home in his last years, is shown with Warren and Raelene at their Hervey Bay home.

He valued his privacy and looked for no recognition but he paid for an expensive operation here, a university education there, supplied manpower or machinery elsewhere. Widows and families battling financial hardship had a helping hand.

Beyond the power lines, another legend was taking shape. Warren was looking after his own in the community he loved dearly. How many individuals were helped will remain a mystery but over the next 30 years he became one of the greatest benefactors in the history of the Fraser Coast.

His devoted wife of 47 years, Raelene, and her children agreed the figure would be in the thousands. “He liked to give. But we probably only knew about 20 per cent of it.” The larrikin son of John and Josephine Persal was born in Maryborough in 1942. His ebullient school days were marked by fun pranks but he could walk into exams and earn high grades – an indication of a remarkable memory and assimilation of detail that would characterise his business ability and social networks.

As a teenager he worked with his father building power lines in south-west Queensland before starting an apprenticeship with ‘Nutty’ Watkins. At night he would make box trailers to sell.

“He was always looking for a way to make a dollar,” said Graham. “He would work 24 hours a day to do it.

“With Watkins Electrical they would use an Ariel and a sidecar with a 12ft ladder along the side. Dad used to be in the sidecar and they would head off to the Bay or somewhere to do a job.”

LARRIKIN DAYS: Motorbike riders Warren (right) and Mick Pohlmann reckoned Hazel Davies’ scooter was just a toy.

After finishing his apprenticeship as an electrician he went to work with his father contracting to build power lines throughout the Wide Bay and Burnett, digging holes with a bar and shovel and standing poles with a shear leg crane on a Bedford truck. He bought two highway borers on Bedford trucks and in 1973 bought his first proline borer lifter on a C1800 international truck. Warren also found time for fishing, crabbing and water-skiing. He loved motorbikes, perhaps a little too well: rumoured to have clocked the fastest time along the length of Kent St he also long rued the day when he was fined a month’s worth of wages for undue noise at The Pocket.

In 1964 he married Gloria Harvey and was working building power lines around Injune and Miles. After her tragic death two years later, he ploughed his energy into his work.

Tragedy struck the Persal family again early in 1970 when his younger brother Bernie died in a road crash.

A blessing also came that year when he married nurse Raelene Keene of Howard, a quiet pillar of strength in the challenging early days in western Queensland who shared her husband’s unswerving values as his empire grew.

“Life with Warren was flat out all the time,” says Raelene.

Soon after they were married they were making regular trips out west, living in caravans with Graham and Janet, born in 1971. Occasionally they rented a house but a caravan was usually their home as they went to where the contracts were. The no-frills lifestyle often included no roads. A contract with MIM delivering power to the Kianga mine near Moura in the early 1970s signalled the start of a lucrative association with the coalfields. The Persal reputation grew as Warren left no stone unturned to deliver quality on time.

In his spare time he took his building tools to Hervey Bay to build the Pine Lodge and Silver Sands units. His father John had already built the Pacific View units. By 1973 Warren and Raelene were ready to build their first home. It was going to be made of timber in John St but Warren decided if a Moura mine contract in the wings came through it would be brick. Brick it was. Warren’s young family continued to travel with him to jobs, growing to three when Brian was born in 1975. Life had another cruel blow in store that year: John Persal drowned in a fishing boat tragedy off Breaksea Spit on Fraser Island.

Five years later Warren looked around for a hotel investment and settled on the Carriers Arms Hotel, carrying out extensive remodelling and installing Angus Robertson as manager while he continued to build power lines in the mines and beyond. The early 1980s was a pivotal time as the mining boom started. It was a case of get big or get out. Warren bit the bullet and kept delivering quality.

THE EARLY DAYS: Work at Moura in the mid-1970s signalled the start of a lucrative association with the coalfields.

He took power to Burketown, to the Ok Tedi mine in Papua New Guinea and to the dam pump at Lake Argyll. In 1987 he built three sections of the Brisbane to Rockhampton rail electrification scheme. In 1990 Persal and Co crews raised more than 1000 poles in six months in a 340km line from Kidston to Normanton. He was innovative, took risks and tackled complex contracts, such as the Cape Upstart project where lines had to be laid with helicopters.

Investing in his home community suited him: he had a passion for the Fraser Coast, keeping his main headquarters in Maryborough, creating opportunities for young people and buying local whenever he could. Staff loyalty at Persal and Co was intense and the backbone of customer service. If a power emergency arose on a big site on Christmas Eve and a crew or equipment was needed urgently, it would be done. Warren continued to invest in the Fraser Coast, setting up a hire business network and in 2014 buying the Beach House Hotel at Scarness.

Brian says Warren was driven by “good old Aussie have a go” and was always looking for opportunities. Janet said despite his extensive and intensive work, “Dad was always about family.” Although, she added, they never had a holiday in a caravan. He had enough of caravanning in the early days. He insisted that each of his three children went out in the world and “work it out for yourself” before he would give them a job. They readily admit he could be a hard taskmaster but saw him as a good teacher. Persal and Co. businesses have given valuable sponsorship to sports clubs, regional events, museum and Fraser Coast book publications. He provided cranes and containers to remove and replace St Paul’s bells when they were refurbished and was the main sponsor for the Duncan Chapman statue, extending that to be a partner in the second stage to be built this year.

BAY ICON: Warren Persal tributeContributed

He also sponsored the statue of St Peter at the Urangan boat harbour, the memorial to fishermen lost at sea. The name of his father John Persal is among those on the base of the statue.

On his office wall he kept a sign, “A man who makes up his mind to win does not know the word ‘Impossible’,” which sums up his courage in business but on the Fraser Coast Warren will always be remembered as the man with a big heart who made his region a better place.

In 2016 his achievements and his role as a benefactor to thousands of individuals and institutions in the region was recognised when he was named Fraser Coast Citizen of the Year.

Warren is survived by his wife Raelene, his children Graham, Janet and Brian and his six grandchildren, Rebecca and Kelsey, Natasha and Kaitlyn and twins Lachlan and Madison.

TRIBUTE: About 1000 people gathered at Maryborough’s Brolga Theatre to remember the life of Fraser Coast businessman and philanthropist Warren Persal.

www.fcci.com.au

NOTE> The editor & owner of this site sees many similarities to himself & our dear departed friend Warren. I too was an Electrician who later employed dozens of people in that industry & others, putting several apprentices through their time.During my time as an electrical apprentice served time with Power Line Constructions[PLC] in Papua New Guinea.& Queensland.

Later to become the owner of several businesses including the Bay Central Tavern in Hervey Bay Qld, Nightclub in the Sunshine coast. Many many more experiences.Later.

However this commemoration is for Warren Purcel Fraser Coast Qld Icon. R.I.P.

Henry Sapiecha

 

Fraser Coast Chronicle says..We’d like a medicinal cannabis industry on the Fraser Coast

THERE has been huge support for the idea of a cannabis facility, similar to the one that will be built in Casino, on the Fraser Coast.

www.druglinks.info

In a stunning coup, Richmond Valley Council is poised to become the centre of Australia’s burgeoning medicinal cannabis industry after securing an agreement with a Canadian company to build a $50-$100 million cannabis greenhouse and processing plant in Casino.

Richmond Valley mayor Robert Mustow said councillors were unanimous in support of the opportunity for Casino which will create 300 jobs.

But if people on the Fraser Coast had their way, there would be a facility like this in our region.

Chronicle reader Janine Wells can’t believe we haven’t been the one to get this idea started.

“So much land here and yet we’re building all these houses/estates,” she said.

” I know people are coming here but there is not much point unless there is industry.”

Australians for the Legalisation of Cannabis said only if it’s legalised and the Australian people have access to it as well.

“It seems to be a big spit in the face that our government wants to cash in on the monetary benefits if this plant, but won’t allow access to those who’s lives could be changed by it – which when you really look at it, is everyone, users and non-users.”

“Cannabis is the game-changer our economy needs.”

Chris Wallace thinks it’s about time cannabis was legalised across the board.

Cory Bush is all for a facility like the one coming to Casino purely for the jobs.

“Yes anything to create job opportunities.”

Zjena Kljinskovic suffers bad join pain and would like this type of industry on the Fraser Coast.

“Can I have a job as well?” she asked.

Chronicle reader Jacqueline Withy was supportive and mentioned hemp is being used to make a variety of commercial and industrial products including rope, clothes, food, paper, textiles, plastics, insulation and biofuel.

*** I had brought up a similar issue on earlier posts in some of my web sites below

Editor of this site. Henry Sapiecha

www.ozrural.com.au

www.druglinks.info

www.fcci.com.au

Henry Sapiecha

THE BURRUM DISTRICT CELEBRATES THE LIFE THAT WAS MALCOM RONALD CHARD @ THE BURRUM DISTRICT COMMUNITY CENTRE @ HOWARD FRASER COAST

Today the 29th September 2017 the community celebrated the life that was Malcolm Ronald Chard. He gave so much to the local community in the Howard district & will be fondly remembered by all by what he did & gave to those around him & beyond.

CELEBRATING HOW HE LIVED NOT HOW HE DIED

Vic Burgess delivered an address to the respecting crown attending which esposed the virtues of the man that was Malcolm Ronald Chard. He will be fondly remembered by all.

We all share in the grief of his family & know that Mal will always be there close to our hearts.

I attended the ceremony with respect to the man who served his community well.

The following images are just some indication of the adulation the mourners felt.

R.I.P. Malcom Ronald Chard 27th March 1948-21st September 2017-69 years

LET YOUR MEMORIES LIVE ON IN THE HEARTS & MINDS OF THOSE YOU LEFT BEHIND

Henry Sapiecha

Cinema complex, six-storey office block in Hervey Bay approved by Fraser Coast Regional Council

A $60 MILLION dollar shopping centre and cinema development has been given the green light by the Fraser Coast Regional Council.

Including a roof deck, underground car park, office buildings, a cinema and food court, the Urraween development was given the tick of approval by 10 of the 11 councillors.

Councillor Stuart Taylor was the only person to vote against the development.

The complex will be located on Bay Dr, Urraween opposite Stockland Hervey Bay.

Town planning firm Adam and Sparkes lodged the application on behalf of Quattro Liuzzi Pty Ltd last year, but it is unclear when construction will start.

Councillor Dennis Chapman said he was thrilled the development had been approved, adding that the construction of the project would bring jobs to the region.

He said the new cinema would be state of the art and would offer a great viewing experience for audiences.

“It’s top of the range, it’s all digital, all the latest technology that you can use in a cinema, that’s what they want to use in this cinema,” Cr Chapman said.

He said there were “five star offices” within the the development as well.

“With having five star offices, we can get state and federal officers and try to encourage them to come into regional Queensland, move out of Brisbane and try to come into regional Queensland.

“Because we need those jobs back here, we need people working in offices like that.”

Cr Taylor said he only voted against the project because of issues with the planning scheme, not because he didn’t support the project.

“I have no objection to the cinema, the theatre, in the proposal as it stands,” he said.

“My issue is, is it defined as impact assessable or code assessable.

“Our planning scheme specifically refers to theatres and indicates it should be impact accessable.

“We’ve assessed that it’s code assessable because the officers have deemed it to be a shopping centre.

“The difference between code assessable and impact assessable is simply that with impact accessible the community has the chance to place objections, those objections have to be considered and if that person who makes the objection is not comfortable with the decision, they can appeal it.

“Those appealing processes through the courts are diminished through code assessable.”\

Some very Interesting things you should know about the Fraser Coast Qld

Enjoy your history?

Or perhaps you are new in town and you’re interested in gaining an interesting insight about Fraser Coast history.

Created here is a list of some interesting facts you may or may not know about the Fraser Coast Region.

MARYBOROUGH

Maryborough was originally named because of the Mary River trunning through the town.

The Mary River was in turn named after Lady Mary Lennox, wife of Sir Charles Augustus Fitzroy, then Governor of the colony of New South Wales. Both the town and river were named in September 1847, two months before Lady Lennox died in a coach accident in December of 1847.

Flooding of the Mary River in 1893

Did you know?

It was a darker part of Maryborough’s history when two Pacific Islander labourers named Tommy and George were hanged.

Even though the government decided to hang the men in Maryborough, the town only had a police lock-up instead of an official prison.

To learn more click here.

HERVEY BAY 

Hervey Bay was named by Captain James Cook when he first sailed the eastern coast of Australia in 1770, the waters of the Great Sandy Strait were just too shallow for the Endeavour to sail through.

This led cook to understand that modern day Fraser Island was a Peninsula connected to the mainland. To name the bay, cook honoured his superior officer Admiral Augustus John Hervey, 3rd Earl of Bristol.

Urangan Pier as the fog lifts on a awesome autumn day on the Fraser Coast.Qld. Australia,,,,Alistair Brightman

FRASER ISLAND 

Fraser Island has had several names, to the Butchulla people’s it is K’gari, translated as paradise in their language.

To the British Explorer Captain James Cook, it was named the Great Sandy Peninsula.

Over 20 years later at the time it would be the Great Sandy Island when it was recognised as an island by Mathew Flinders.

This island would be renamed after James Fraser due to the events in 1936 when his ship foundered on a coral reef off the north-eastern coast of Australia.

The lifeboat contain Captain Fraser his wife Eliza Anne Fraser and several crew landed on the northern shores of the island which is now known as Fraser Island.

Initially the castaways did trade with the locals indigenous people for goods to repair their boat, until six seaman took guns and set off down the coast to the south.

Eliza later claimed to have been captured and ill-treated by the indigenous populations who had otherwise been known for taking in Europeans and treating them well.

While the truth of her accounts is disputed, the fame they accrued led to further souring relations with the indigenous local peoples and the island being named in honour of James Fraser who had died whilst on this island.

Lake MacKenzie at Fraser Island

TIARO

Tiaro’s name apparently is derived from a word of Indigenous origin, meaning a dead or withered tree.

GHOST HILL 

The origin of the name ghost hill stretches back to the beginning of the town, taking on a myth of its own.

The story told today is that a wife in the area, it seems referred to as named as Mrs List, was worried that her husband was late home form his work in Maryborough. Qld.

While concerned the wife took a lantern and went to wait by the road in her long white night bed gown.

At that same time, Boyle Martin and Anders Christiansen were going back to their camp form the Hunter’s Hotel.

Seeing these characters, this wife ran into the shubbery to hide, the men seeing only the long white night gown and a floating lantern really thought they had seen a ghost running through the trees.

Most version of the story mention Boyle Martin.

Boyle Martin was as well the name of the first European to settle in the Hervey Bay area.

Four years ago the Fraser Coast Council named a section of the beach after him.

Henry Sapiecha

Money CASH STASH in the tens of thousands of dollars found in recycled cabinet at a Hervey Bay market Qld Fraser Coast

Photo: Police are hoping someone may recognise this TV cabinet, found at a Hervey Bay recycling market.

A man discovered a cash windfall of thousands of dollars when the draw fell out of a cabinet he had just purchased from a council recycling market in southern Queensland.

Now police are appealing for public help to find the original owner of the television cabinet.

Police said the Nanango man purchased the timber cabinet at the Hervey Bay Recycling Market on Chapel Road and Aarlborg Road at North Nikenbah on June 27.

When he was unloading the cabinet at home, one of the drawers opened and the cash fell out.

The man then went to Nanango Police Station and handed the cash over to officers.

In a Facebook post from the Fraser Coast council, the sum of money found was in the tens of thousands of dollars.

Nanango Police Constable Kenneth O’Connor said police were eager to reunite it with the owner.

“We’re thinking it more than likely came from that council region,” he said.

“It could have been either picked up from a truck that goes out and picks items of furniture up from households, or it could have possibly been delivered to the recycling centre.”

www.money-au.com

Henry Sapiecha

FRASER COAST Qld Touch Football confirms date for the 2018 Junior State Cup after 7,000 persons swarmed on the Fraser Coast Area in 2017

BOOKED OUT-SOLD OUT-FRASER COAST QLD AUSTRALIA REJOICES IN ACCOMMODATION OVERLOAD.

QUEENSLAND Touch Football has confirmed the dates of the 2018 Junior State Cup.

The organisation’s biggest event of the year will be held in Hervey Bay from July 12-14.

The second weekend of Queensland’s school holidays, players, referees, officials and spectators will flock from across the state to take part in the annual tournament.

Qld Touch CEO Jamie O’Connor said this year’s event attracted more than 7000 visitors to the region.

A record 220 teams entered from 29 affiliates, from Mackay in Nth Qld, south to the NSW border and west to the outback town of Roma.

www.worldfairs.org

Henry Sapiecha